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Adam Carolla Talks Entitled College Students With SilenceU’s Rob Montz: When Did This Become Okay?


Adam Carolla interviews Rob Montz for the documentary SilenceU. Carolla, Montz and co-hosts "Bald Bryan" Bishop and Gina Grad weigh in on the impact political correctness has had on college campi, namely Brown University and Yale University. Carolla also addresses how he feels about higher learning and what he would like his children to do.

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CNN’s Jake Tapper to Nikki Haley: Is Trump Still Concerned Syria Intervention Could Spark “World War Three”?


CNN's Jake Tapper asks U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley about comments made by President Trump during the 2016 campaign that intervening in Syria could lead to "world war three." At a campaign rally in Waterloo, IA in September, Trump said: "We're going to start World War Three? Over Syria? Give me a break!" TAPPER: While I'm not second-guessing the decision, you know, as I said, it's not the first chemical weapons attack. It's not the worst chemical weapons attack. And, in fact, during the campaign, President Trump warned against getting involved militarily in Syria. Take a listen. TRUMP: It's not that big an area. The airspace is very limited. So, now you have — what, do we start World War III over Syria? TAPPER: So, he was worried about starting World War III over Syria. Why is that no longer a concern? And why was the 2013 chemical weapons attack, which, as you know, was deadlier, not a trigger for him in terms of the principle of action in Syria? HALEY: Well, he wasn't president in 2013. And I can tell you– TAPPER: But he opposed it. He opposed action. HALEY: But I don't know what his thought process was then. I can tell you what his thought process was this week, which was, he is not going to condone chemical weapons use ever. And so what you saw was, he wasn't just going to say it. He was going to act. And what we have seen at the United Nations is a huge sigh of relief. They're just so thankful that the United States led on this issue. And we called out Russia, because we needed to. We put Iran on notice, because that — we need to get that influence out of there. And we told Syria, we are not going to watch this anymore. And so what the president chooses to do, I hope that what Iran sees and Syria sees and Russia sees is that this is a president that's not afraid to act, and that he does expect to move towards a political solution. And they have to show genuine willingness to do that. TAPPER: He's not concerned anymore, though, about this being a potential quagmire or about this potentially starting World War III? HALEY: I can tell you that, of the conversations I had this week, he knew what the risks were, he knew what the situation was, he looked at the history of the situation, and he decided. And I think his decision was right. And I think you can see that from the international community. They all fully support it.

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CNN’s Jake Tapper to Nikki Haley: Is Trump Still Concerned Syria Intervention Could Spark “World War III”?


CNN's Jake Tapper asks U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley about comments made by President Trump during the 2016 campaign that intervening in Syria could lead to "world war three." At a campaign rally in Waterloo, IA in September, Trump said: "We're going to start World War Three? Over Syria? Give me a break!" TAPPER: While I'm not second-guessing the decision, you know, as I said, it's not the first chemical weapons attack. It's not the worst chemical weapons attack. And, in fact, during the campaign, President Trump warned against getting involved militarily in Syria. Take a listen. TRUMP: It's not that big an area. The airspace is very limited. So, now you have — what, do we start World War III over Syria? TAPPER: So, he was worried about starting World War III over Syria. Why is that no longer a concern? And why was the 2013 chemical weapons attack, which, as you know, was deadlier, not a trigger for him in terms of the principle of action in Syria? HALEY: Well, he wasn't president in 2013. And I can tell you– TAPPER: But he opposed it. He opposed action. HALEY: But I don't know what his thought process was then. I can tell you what his thought process was this week, which was, he is not going to condone chemical weapons use ever. And so what you saw was, he wasn't just going to say it. He was going to act. And what we have seen at the United Nations is a huge sigh of relief. They're just so thankful that the United States led on this issue. And we called out Russia, because we needed to. We put Iran on notice, because that — we need to get that influence out of there. And we told Syria, we are not going to watch this anymore. And so what the president chooses to do, I hope that what Iran sees and Syria sees and Russia sees is that this is a president that's not afraid to act, and that he does expect to move towards a political solution. And they have to show genuine willingness to do that. TAPPER: He's not concerned anymore, though, about this being a potential quagmire or about this potentially starting World War III? HALEY: I can tell you that, of the conversations I had this week, he knew what the risks were, he knew what the situation was, he looked at the history of the situation, and he decided. And I think his decision was right. And I think you can see that from the international community. They all fully support it.

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Tillerson: First Priority Is To Defeat ISIS, Assad Comes Next


Secretary of State Rex Tillerson tells 'Face The Nation' host John Dickerson about the Trump administration's plan for defeating ISIS and dealing with the aftermath in Syria. Related Video: McCain: Fight Assad And ISIS At Same Time; "We Can Walk And Chew Gum" TILLERSON: Well, I think, John, it is important that we keep our priorities straight. And we believe that the first priority is the defeat of ISIS, that, by defeating ISIS and removing their caliphate from their control, we have now eliminated at least or minimized a particular threat, not just the United States, but to the whole stability in the region. And once the ISIS threat has been reduced or eliminated, I think we can turn our attention directly to stabilizing the situation in Syria. We are hopeful that we can prevent a continuation of the civil war, and that we can bring the parties to the table to begin the process of political discussions. Clearly, that requires the participation of the regime, with the support of their allies. And we are hopeful that Russia will choose to play a constructive role in supporting cease-fires through their own Astana talks, but also ultimately through Geneva. And if we can achieve cease-fires in zones of stabilization in Syria, then I believe we hope we will have the conditions to begin a useful political process. DICKERSON: This was the first crisis that started in and was carried through on this president's watch. Can you give us a window into that and what the president's attention was focused on? TILLERSON: Well, the president, I would tell you, was very thoughtful in terms of the decision to take the strike. He requested immediately from the Defense Department and our military planners multiple options and requested of the State Department, working with the National Security Council, diplomatic options. We had multiple meetings to discuss those options. He asked a number of questions, probing those, so that they were fully developed. And then we had two meetings down — once we arrived in Mar-a-Lago, in which ultimately the president made the ultimate decision. So, I think, John, yes, I would describe the president's leadership in this issue was extraordinary in terms of the way he conducted those meetings. He clearly wanted everyone to express their personal views around the options. He invited everyone to express those openly, without reservation, so that he could consider all of those options. And he did consider them, and then ultimately made the decision. So I think it was a clear demonstration of his leadership, but also a clear demonstration of how well the team of people that he has put in place are able to work together to arrive at an answer that is clearly the right one. Tillerson also appeared on ABC's 'This Week' on Sunday morning:

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McCain: Fight Assad And ISIS At Same Time; “We Can Walk And Chew Gum”


Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona says he disagrees with Secretary Tillerson that the U.S. should just concentrate on ISIS. "We can walk and chew gum. We have the capability to do both, the Senator adds. Related Video: Tillerson: First Priority Is To Defeat ISIS, Assad Comes Next "They're totally connected," McCain said about the opposing sides in the Syrian Civil War. MCCAIN: Well, I think what the president did was an excellent first step and it was a reversal of the last eight years. And I think it was important. But it is now vitally important we develop a strategy, we put that strategy in motion, and we bring about peace in the region. And that obviously means that there has to be a cessation of these war crimes. John, dropping, using chemical weapons is a war crime, but starving thousands of people in prisons is also. Barrel bombs which indiscriminately kill innocent civilians, precision strikes done by Russians on hospitals in Aleppo are war crimes as well. So there's a lot of war crimes that are taking place. And another area — aspect of this that I do not agree with the secretary is that you have to just concentrate on ISIS. We will take Mosul. We will take Raqqa. And we better have strategies as to how to handle those places once we have won it. But they are not disconnected from Bashar al-Assad and the al Qaeda and the war crimes that have been taking place. You can't — to a large degree, Bashar al-Assad, by polarizing the Syrian people, have also given rise to ISIS and al Qaeda. So they are both connected. And I believe that the United States of America can address both at the same time. We can walk and chew gum. We have the capability to do both. And, yes, we want a negotiated settlement, but the only way that that will happen is if it is not in their interests to continue what they have been successful at for over eight years. And that is why I thought, symbolically and psychologically, the president's action was very important, but now we better follow it up. And, by the way, we should have cratered the runways. DICKERSON: Just to follow up on that, Senator, Secretary of State Tillerson said when I listed those other parts of Syrian efforts that you mention, he said that America needs to — quote — "keep its priorities straight and focus on ISIS." But your argument is that taking care of the humanitarian actions that Bashar al-Assad is — is taking, that that is a part of the fight against ISIS as well. MCCAIN: I think they are totally connected. And also, when you see these crimes that are being committed, they are horrifying. John, I also believe that a grieving mother whose child has been killed isn't too concerned whether it is a chemical weapon or a barrel bomb. He is still slaughtering people. And we may stop the chemical weapons. But we have also got to stop the other indiscriminate, inhumane war crimes that are being committed as well. And that means, obviously, trying to set up some kind of safe zone, so that these refugees can have a place where they can be. And, also, that would help with the refugee flow issue. DICKERSON: Senator, you said you had wished that they had cratered the runways. Based on your assessment of the damage that was taken from the U.S. military action, what kind of a signal do you think that sent to President Assad? MCCAIN: Well, I think the fact that we acted was very important, and I support the president's action. And I have been told that there was some recommendations to take out all six places that the Syrian air force operates out of. But now that they are flying again, basically, within 36 hours is not a good signal. But I would point out, taking out their — all their support facilities doesn't let them fly with any consistency. But it — the signal that they are able to fly almost right away out of the same facility indicates that I don't think we did as thorough enough job, which would have been cratering the runways. And somebody will say, well, then they can fill in the runways. Yes. And we can crater them again too.

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Jeanine Pirro: Time For GOP To Learn From Trump, “Strap In, Buck Up And Start Fighting Like Your Leader”


Jeanine Pirro, host of Justice with Judge Jeanine on FOX News, delivers a challenge to Congressional Republicans on the Saturday edition of her show. "Strap in, buckle up and start fighting like your leader," she said.

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