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‘Face The Nation’ Panel: What Really Motivated Charlottesville Protests?


Sherrilyn Ifill, Elle Reeve, and Christian Picciolini provide a deeper analysis on the events of Charlottesville and President Trump's response to the violence. More: Julie Pace, Jamelle Bouie, Jeffrey Goldberg, and Reihan Salam join Face the Nation Moderator to discuss President Trump's response to Charlottesville and Steve Bannon's exit from the White House.

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Ohio Gov. John Kasich: Republican Party Is Going To “Have To Admit” Some People “Need Help” Paying For Health Care


Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich said Sunday that the key to bipartisan health care reform is that Republicans "have to admit" that there are people out there "who are going to need help" paying for health care. Kasich appeared Sunday on CBS's "Face the Nation,†with Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper. Kasich said: "Republicans are going to have to admit there's going to be a group of people out there who are going to need help. These are some philosophical differences between the parties, but if you have a good spirit and you understand that the system is beginning to melt down on the exchange side jeopardizing health care for many Americans, I'm hopeful we can get there." Transcript: DICKERSON: And we have seen in Washington both sides say they don't want to give up much of anything. Give me your sense of what Republicans should back down on and what Democrats should back down on just as a preliminary good-faith effort to show that people are, on the health care question, committed to maybe working together. KASICH: Yes. Well, John, look, before we get to specifics, I love working with John Hickenlooper. He's terrific. This — I have had a history of this. I worked with Ron Dellums on the B-2 bomber, reforming that. I was able to work with Tim Penny, my great friend from Minnesota, to lead the fight to get us to a balanced budget. And what John Hickenlooper and I are doing at the present is, he's going to have his staff and my staff — and we have had preliminary conversations, because John and I are becoming friends. And they're going to sit down and they're going to look at the differences. And one of the problems is that there are some in the Democratic Party that think the whole system needs to be changed at once. And there are some in the Republican Party that say, look, let's let the market work to drive down health care costs. But we're going to have to make a commitment, a serious, significant commitment to those people who are left behind. And so I think Democrats are going to have to get to the point where they say, let's let the market work, give people more choice, bring down the cost of health insurance. And Republicans are going to have to admit that there's going to be a group of people out there who are going to need help. That — these are some philosophical differences between the parties. But if you have a good spirit and you understand that the system is beginning to melt down on the exchange side, jeopardizing health care for many, many Americans, I'm hopeful we can get there. Now, John and I are going to start with our staffs, before we build it out. And they may have to have couple meetings in Chicago. John and I may have to get together. Maybe we can get there. Maybe we can't. But we're friends. And as a result that, I'm optimistic that we will get somewhere on this whole thing.

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Sen. Jeff Flake: Republican Party “Has Lost Its Way,” Given In To Nativism, Protectionism, Xenophobia


Sen. Jeff Flake, Republican of Arizona, speaks with CBS's John Dickerson about the political climate today: DICKERSON: And that brings us to the other senator from Arizona, Jeff Flake, who "The New York Times" columnist David Brooks writes is sunny and kind in a time when politics has become a blood sport. He joins us today to talk about his new book, "Conscience of a Conservative: A Rejection of Destructive Politics and a Return to Principle." Welcome, Senator. SEN. JEFF FLAKE (R), ARIZONA: Thanks for having me on. DICKERSON: Why did you write the book? FLAKE: I felt that, just like Goldwater had felt in his time, 56 years ago, when he wrote the original ""Conscience of Conservative," that the party had lost its way. And I think, similarly today, the party's lost its way. We have given into nativism and protectionism. And I think that, if we're going to be a governing party in the future, and a majority party, we have got to go back to traditional conservatism, limited government, economic freedom, individual responsibility, respect for free trade. Those are the principles that made us who we are. DICKERSON: One of the things you write in the book is: "It is not enough to be conservative anymore. You have to be vicious." What do you mean by that? FLAKE: Well, if you look at the politics of today, the tape from last week at the White House and the language that was used then, and we have seen, unfortunately, too many examples of members of Congress and other elected officials using language, referring to your opponents in ways that you would have never done before, ascribing the worst motives to your opponents and assuming that other Americans are the enemy. And that is just not the way it used to be. And I don't think it can be that way in the future. DICKERSON: Is it your view that those — that kind of behavior is –well, it's bad on its own terms, but is also getting in the way, it's blocking out? FLAKE: You bet. You bet. I mean, there are big issues that we have got to solve. You talked about North Korea, the difficult foreign policy things that we have to do. But that and deficit, for example, health care reform, these are things that can't be done by one party. We have just seen the limits of what one party can do. Even if you change the rules of the Senate, which we should not do, there are limits to what one party can do. If we're going to solve this debt problem, $20 trillion of debt we have — we're going to be running deficits — deficits again over a trillion dollars soon. Those require both parties sitting together and sharing the risk. And it's hard to imagine that can happen when we're ascribing the worst motives to our opponents… FLAKE: Well, I got to Congress in 2001, myself and Mike Pence, actually. We had run think tanks, conservative think tanks, in the '90s. We got elected together. And we sat next to each other early on, on the floor. I remember him saying that he felt like that we were Minutemen called up to the battlefront, only to be told the revolution of ideas was over. And we have given into kind of the politics of personal destruction, and quickly to a lot of spending and other things that really, I think, made the ground fertile for the type of politics that we have today. And that's unfortunate. I think we, as Republicans, kind of gave away the limited government mantle when we spent like crazy in 2000, 2006 while Republicans had the majority in both houses and the White House. And then that forced us to delve into the wedge issues, like flag burning, or the case of Terri Schiavo or things like that. And now we have, I think, taken up a banner that is not familiar to us. It's one of intense nationalism and nativism and sometimes xenophobia.

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Feinstein: “Very Disappointed” In China’s Response To North Korea


Senator Dianne Feinstein, D-California, discusses the North Korean missile test, the failed health care bill, and the criticism of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. DICKERSON: And we're joining now by the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, California Senator Dianne Feinstein. Welcome, Senator. I want to start with the other committee you're on, the Senate Intelligence Committee, on this question of North Korea. You know the intelligence. What do you make of the latest moves by North Korea? SEN. DIANNE FEINSTEIN (D), CALIFORNIA: Well, I make it as a clear and present danger to the United States. I have spent time on the intelligence and at the briefings and done as much reading as I possibly could. And I'm convinced that North Korea has never moved at the speed that this leader has to develop an ICBM, to put solid fuel, to have an interesting launch device, and to have a trajectory which, as of the latest analysis, would enable it to go about 6,000 miles, and maybe even hit as far east as Chicago. We can't have that. To me, it points out the danger in isolating a country, that they go to the science and technical know-how to show their brute force, not to handle the isolation. I think the only solution is a diplomatic one. I'm very disappointed in China's response, that it has not been firmer or more helpful. And I think that the administration — and this is one of the reasons that I hope General Kelly will be able to be effective, even beyond a chief of staff, is to begin some very negotiation with the North and stop this program.

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‘Face The Nation’ Panel: Is Health Care Reform Dead? General Kelly Joins WH


Ruth Marcus, Ben Domenech, David Nakamura, and Nancy Cordes discuss the failed health care bill and where it could go from here. Ruth Marcus, Ben Domenech, David Nakamura, and Nancy Cordes discuss General John Kelly's new position and President Trump's criticism of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Amy Walter, Dan Balz, Megan McArdle, and Jamelle Bouie discuss path forward for a health care vote before the August recess. CBS News Chief White House Correspondent Major Garrett and White House and Senior Foreign Affairs Correspondent Margaret Brennan discuss the North Korean missile test and the chief of staff change.

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