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’60 Minutes’ Reveals Undercover FBI Agent On Scene At Garland, TX Terror Attack


On this week's broadcast of CBS News' 60 Minutes, correspondent Anderson Cooper reports an undercover FBI agent tracking jihadists responsible for the Garland, Texas terrorist attack was on the scene prior to the commission of the act. Transcript, via CBS News: Anderson Cooper: After the trial, you discovered that the government knew a lot more about the Garland attack than they had let on? Dan Maynard, ATTORNEY FOR JIHADIST: That's right. Yeah. After the trial we found out that they had had an undercover agent who had been texting with Simpson, less than three weeks before the attack, to him "Tear up Texas.†Which to me was an encouragement to Simpson. The man he's talking about was a special agent of the FBI, working undercover posing as an Islamic radical. The government sent attorney Dan Maynard 60 pages of declassified encrypted messages between the agent and Elton Simpson – and argued "Tear up Texas†was not an incitement. But Simpson's response was incriminating, referring to the attack against cartoonists at the French magazine Charlie Hebdo: "bro, you don't have to say that…†He wrote "you know what happened in Paris… so that goes without saying. No need to be direct.†But it turns out the undercover agent did more than just communicate online with Elton Simpson. In an affidavit filed in another case the government disclosed that the FBI undercover agent had actually "traveled to Garland, Texas, and was present… at the event.†Dan Maynard: I was shocked. I mean I was shocked that the government hadn't turned this over. I wanted to know when did he get there, why was he there? And this past November, Maynard was given another batch of documents by the government, revealing the biggest surprise of all. The undercover FBI agent was in a car directly behind Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi when they started shooting. This cell-phone photo of school security guard Bruce Joiner and police officer Greg Stevens was taken by the undercover agent seconds before the attack. Anderson Cooper: The idea that he's taking photograph of the two people who happen to be attacked moments before they're attacked. Dan Maynard: It's stunning. Anderson Cooper: I mean, talk about being in the right or the wrong place at the right or the wrong time. Dan Maynard: The idea that he's right there 30 seconds before the attack happens is just incredible to me. Anderson Cooper: What would you want to ask the undercover agent? Dan Maynard: I would love to ask the undercover agent– Are these the only communications that you had with Simpson? Did you have more communications with Simpson? How is it that you ended up coming to Garland, Texas? Why are you even there? We wanted to ask the FBI those same questions. But the bureau would not agree to an interview. All the FBI would give us was this email statement. It reads: "There was no advance knowledge of a plot to attack the cartoon drawing contest in Garland, Texas.†If you're wondering what happened to the FBI's undercover agent, he fled the scene but was stopped at gunpoint by Garland police. This is video of him in handcuffs, recorded by a local news crew. We've blurred his face to protect his identity. Dan Maynard: I can't tell you whether the FBI knew the attack was gonna occur. I don't like to think that they let it occur. But it is shocking to me that an undercover agent sees fellas jumping out of a car and he drives on. I find that shocking. Anderson Cooper: That he didn't try to stop– Dan Maynard: He didn't try to stop ‘em. Or he didn't do something. I mean, he's an agent, for gosh sakes. Anderson Cooper: If this attack had gone a different way, and lots of people had been killed, would the fact that an undercover FBI agent was on the scene have become essentially a scandal? Seamus Hughes: It woulda been a bigger story. I think you would have seen congressional investigations and things like that. Lucky for the FBI and for the participants in the event you know, here in Texas, you know, everyone's a good shot there. The FBI's actions around this foiled attack offer a rare glimpse into the complexities faced by those fighting homegrown extremism. Today, the battle often begins online where identifying terrorists can be the difference between a massacre, and the one that never occurred in Garland, Texas. Anderson Cooper: People brag about stuff. People talk big. One of the difficulties for the FBI is trying to figure out who's just talking and who actually may execute an attack. Seamus Hughes: That's the hardest part when you talk about this, right. There's a lot of guys who talk about how great ISIS is. It's very hard to tell when someone crosses that line. And in most of the cases, you see the FBI has some touchpoint with those individuals beforehand. There had been an assessment, a preliminary investigation or a full investigation. It's just very hard to know when somebody decides to jump. (via Breitbart Video)

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’60 Minutes’ Report: How Fake News Affected 2016 Election


CBS Evening News anchor Scott Pelley investigates fake news for this week's broadcast of 60 Minutes. The correspondent spoke with purveyors of fake news, including Danger & Play creator Mike Cernovich. Cernovich argued that he doesn't publish fake news, he is just fighting about those "gunning" for him, such as CBS News. Pelley continues to report on fake news in the Overtime portion of 60 Minutes: Transcript, via CBS News: SCOTT PELLEY: In this last election, the nation was assaulted by imposters masquerading as reporters. They poisoned the conversation with lies on the left and on the right. Many did it to influence the outcome, others, just to make a buck. The president uses the term "fake news†to discredit responsible reporting that he doesn't like, but we're going to show you how con-artists insert truly fake news into the national conversation with fraudulent software that scams your social media account. The stories are fake, but the consequences are real. This past December, Edgar Welch opened fire in a Washington D.C. pizzeria. He told police he was there to rescue children forced into prostitution by Hillary Clinton. The story of Secretary Clinton's child sex-trafficking operation, in a pizzeria, was invented before the election by fraudulent news sites and shared by millions. James Alefantis owns the restaurant. Continue reading…

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France’s Marine Le Pen: “Globalism Has Become An Ideology With No Constraints”


The following is a script from "Le Pen,†which aired on March 5, 2017. Anderson Cooper is the correspondent. Michael H. Gavshon, Francois Bringer and David M. Levine, producers.
Anderson Cooper: The polls say you can't win.
Marine Le Pen (translation): Yes. They also said that Brexit wasn't going to happen, that Donald Trump wasn't going to be elected, wasn't even going to be his party's nominee. Well, they're saying that less and less now. They are much more cautious, much more cautious now.
The nationalist policies Marine Le Pen embraces are gaining supporters throughout France and around the world. She's hostile to free trade, rejects open borders and says globalization, promoted for decades by France's political elites, is destroying her country.
Anderson Cooper: So how do you explain what is happening. Did leaders go too far?
Marine Le Pen (translation): Yes. Yes. Of course they've gone too far. Globalization has become an ideology with no constraints. And now, nations are forcing themselves back into the debate. Nations with borders we control, with people that we listen to, with real economies, not Wall Street economies, but rather factories and farmers. And this goes against this unregulated globalization, wild, savage globalization.
Anderson Cooper: Savage globalization?
Marine Le Pen (translation): Yes, Savage of course. Wild globalization has benefited some, but it's been a catastrophe for most.

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