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‘Art Of The Deal’ Ghostwriter: Trump Presidency “Reminds Me Of Watergate And The Last Days Of Nixon”


The ghostwriter of Donald Trump's bestseller The Art of the Deal is interviewed by Anderson Cooper on Thursday's broadcast of CNN's Anderson Cooper 360: ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: Tony Schwartz knows the President. He really knows and no one else really does and he says he's probably going to resign, in his opinion. He thinks the President will resign. Ultimately, Schwartz spent nearly a year with Trump ghostwriting "The Art of the Deal". He quote, he tweeted this, "The circle is closing a blinding speed. Trump is going to resign and declare victory before Mueller and Congress leave him no choice. Trump's presidency is effectively over." He said, "Would be amazed if he survives till the end of the year. More likely resigns by fall if not sooner." Tony Schwartz joins me now. So Tony, I mean, I'm wondering what — I mean, you and I have talked about this before, you thought this may be for long time, what makes you feel so strongly now? TONY SCHWARTZ, CO-AUTHOR, "THE ART OF THE DEAL": Well, I think the snowball is beginning to gather momentum as it comes down the mountain. And it reminds me a lot of Watergate in the last days of Nixon. When the tide turns, it really turns and that's what happened here. You look at the range of things that have happened most notably his response to — event in Virginia this last week, and what he's gone back and forth saying to Kim Jong-un about North Korea, and you've got kind of — he put himself in an isolated no-win position. The level of itself disruptiveness is staggering, but what he's done is he's pushed away all the potential allies and they were beginning to diminish in number anyway, but he's now pushed away business people, CEOs. He's now pushed away Bannon. You see Bannon playing politics with his own boss. He's pushed away, you know, a good percentage of the Congress, even in his own party.

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Vice News: Charlottesville White Nationalist Marchers Knew What They Were Doing


Elle Reeve of Vice News talks to CNN's Anderson Cooper about her experience on the ground in Charlottesville, Virginia, during a white nationalist rally that has sparked national outrage. ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: "Vice News" correspondent Elle Reeve was in the middle of that. She joins us now. Elle, thanks for being with us. You were at this Tiki torch march. Explain for us what you saw and the chants you heard. ELLE REEVE, CORRESPONDENT, VICE NEWS TONIGHT: Well, the most striking thing is how well-organized it was. There's people doing crowd control. There are people dropping off specific locations. There was security. There are people handing out extra Tiki torches. Everyone who was there knew exactly what they were signing up for. COOPER: When you say there was security, you mean security by the neo-Nazis, by the white supremacists, by the protesters? REEVE: That's right. They have a circle of mostly Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who now do security for Richard Spencer and other white nationalist groups. COOPER: And when the president says that there were good people at this march, that they were quietly there to protest the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue, that not all of them were neo-Nazis or white supremacists, what do you think — is that true? REEVE: No. Everyone who was there knew what they were doing. They were shouting, Jews will not replace us. It was very well- coordinated. They had an order to the chants. Like there was no mistaking. There are no innocent people wandering up and accidentally getting involved in this. COOPER: So, there wasn't a contingent of just, you know, Confederate statue-loving, civil war history buffs who — REEVE: History buffs? No. COOPER: — who came later and joined — happened to stumble in upon this neo-Nazi march. Everybody who was there was part of this and knew exactly what they were doing? REEVE: That's right. They had a set time. They lined up. Everyone got in line. They got their torches. We saw them snake all the way through the field. It was very clear that they had planned this.

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CNN’s Navarro to Jeff Lord: “It Must Be So Nice To Be A White Male”


Republican commentator Ana Navarro got in a heated argument with CNN colleague and Trump supporter Jeffrey Lord on Wednesday's broadcast of Anderson Cooper 360. Remarking on Trump's plan to reform the legal immigration process Navarro said, "You know, Jeff, it must be so nice to be a white male." "I want to address what is assimilation," Lord said. My mother is Irish on her side of the family. So, you know, what, on Saint Patrick's Day I have corn beef and cabbage and maybe a green beer. Trust me, I'm not Irish, I'm an American. That's the point. There is no one in America whose an American citizen. Donald Trump. He's German." "We have to move past this and not do a thing where we are in essence resegregating the country. That's a bad thing," Lord added. "It must be so nice to be a white male," the CNNer said. "What makes us wonderful here in America is that I can go celebrate St. Patrick's Day and that you can celebrate Cinco de Mayo. Or that you can celebrate September 15th (Mexican Independence Day). And that does not define being American." In the panel that included New York Times columnist Charles Blow, Navarro said nobody engages in identity politics more than President Trump. "My concern is that we have, with all this business of identifying communities, this community, that community, etc., etc., etc., with all the emphasis on that, that it keeps people from assimilating into the larger American culture," Lord said. "Nobody does more identity politics than Donald Trump," Navarro said. "The guy who came down, announced he was running for president and called Mexicans rapists. Nobody does more identity politics than the guy who called for the Muslim ban. Nobody does more identity politics than the guy who tweets against transgenders. So if you want there to be no identity politics, my request to you is to start by telling the president you support regardless of what he does to stop doing it himself." Blow told Lord "white people literally invented the racial caste system in this country." "Literally invented it in order to advantage themselves and disadvantage others," he added. "And then they all became Democrats," Lord shot back. "Okay, you can go with that if you want to," Blow responded.

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Turley: “There Is An Effort To Try And Find Crimes In Everything Trump Does”


Georgetown University law professor Jonathan Turley on President Trump helping to craft Donald Trump Jr.'s statement on his meeting with the Russian attorney. From the Tuesday broadcast of CNN's Anderson Cooper 360: TURLEY: It is not witness tampering. It doesn't even come close to that standard. You know, there wasn't any plan for testimony on this point. But more importantly, it doesn't meet the statutory definition… We have to be careful that everything the president does is not some perpetual motion machine under the criminal code. Everything he does is not necessarily a crime. It can be ill-advised. It can be even moronic. But, there is an effort to try to find crimes in everything that occurs here. There are serious problems here. There's a legitimate investigation going forward. This was a remarkably bad idea, but I don't think we should start talking about witness tampering. (via Breitbart Video)

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Anderson Cooper to Jeffrey Lord: If Trump Took A Dump On Your Desk, You Would Defend It


On the Friday night broadcast of his CNN show, Anderson Cooper told network commentator and Trump supporter Jeffrey Lord that if the president took a "dump on his desk" he would defend it. "I don't know what he would do that you would not defend," Cooper added. "Anderson, this is offending Eastern media elite sensibilities," Lord replied. Cooper later apologized for the remark. "Jeff, I regret the crude sentence I spoke earlier," Cooper said. "I apologize, you know, I like having your voice on here, I think you're an important voice to us. I'm sorry." ANDERSON COOPER: Jeff, I got to start with you. Sean Spicer didn't deny the president said these things about director Comey, do you defend the president on this one? JEFFREY LORD, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: No. I think, he's perfectly within his rights to say them. I mean, he's the President of the United States. He can say what he wants. COOPER: Right. He can say what he wants, is it smart? LORD: Well, sure — I mean, sure I mean, he gets subjective about this and as a matter of fact (INAUDIBLE) COOPER: Well yes, I'm not asking is it subjective, is it smart? LORD: Is it smart? Well, I don't think it matters, either way, in truth, I really don't and, Anderson, I just want to say this. COOPER: I believe that's a punt. LORD: But, we're talking about all this Washington — what? I'm sorry? COOPER: I said, I believe, that's called a punt. I don't know much about sports but I believe that's a punt. LORD: No, no. Anderson, Anderson, look, this is not, you know, some smoking gun. That's his honest opinion which lord knows if he hasn't said it to the Russians (INAUDIBLE) COOPER: His honest opinion is that the former FBI director is a nut job and that this relieves some of the pressure on the Russian stuff? That's his honest opinion. I have no doubt that that's his honest opinion but do you think that that is smart for a guy under investigation to be saying that? LORD: Yes, I do and I'll tell you exactly why I think it's smart. Remember this statement from President Obama? "Tell Vladimir I'll be more flexible after the election", quote, unquote, to the Russian prime minister, caught on a high (INAUDIBLE) now, that is what you call collusion with Russians. Vladimir, for all we know, was flexible with Barrack Obama to help him be reelected, was there a call for a special prosecutor? (CROSSTALK) COOPER: Was there an investigation by the FBI? Was there a special counsel? No, and no and no and so I know — I mean, yes, I know you got to bring up Obama every time or, you know, got to bring up somebody else — LORD: I got it, I got it (INAUDIBLE) COOPER: Because, you can't really defend it in all fairness. You can't defend what the president of the United States just said. LORD: I don't care — I mean, I don't care what he says to the Russian prime — to the Russians. I mean, he's the president of the United States. If he wants to say that, Barack Obama wants to say whatever — if George Bush says I looked in his eyes — COOPER: If he took a dump on his desk, you would defend him. I mean, I don't know what he would do that you would not defend. I mean, you're a loyal guy. I think that speaks well of you but I — LORD: Anderson, this is offending Eastern media elite sensibilities. Right here in America, they all think, yes, the FBI director was a nut job and worse. COOPER: Right.

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Van Jones vs. Jeffrey Lord: Trump Is “President Snowflake”


On Thursday night's Anderson Cooper 360, CNN commentator Van Jones says that President Trump's response to the FBI's Russia probe is turning him into 'President Snowflake.' ANDERSON COOPER: Today the president tweeting about the [special counsel], calling it a witch hunt. Doesn't that actually resonate with his base? I mean, the notion that everyone is out to get him. I assume that's why either he has no control over himself and he just blurts these things out and he generally believes them, or he blurts them out and believes them and he believes it helps stir up the base. VAN JONES, CNN: I think he is correct in that. However, what is interesting is a different Donald Trump. When he ran, he was this tough guy. This guy is going to get things done. He's a great negotiator. He's Trumpzilla. He was going to make Washington bow down. He was going to drain the swamp. Now, he's President Snowflake.' Okay? Everything he's said is, 'Oh, they're mean to me,' and 'they don't like me,' and 'I just don't understand it and it's not fair!' Watch the full segment: Transcript, via CNN: ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: Joining us now is Gloria Borger, Van Jones and Jeffrey Lord. So, Jeff, why is the president still talking about Director Comey saying he was unpopular when the acting FBI director said the exact opposite last week? Does it serve his argument? JEFFREY LORD, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: Yeah. Anderson, there's two different situations there. What you're talking about is within the FBI, although certainly I have heard from other FBI — ex-FBI members who disagree, et cetera, but I'll cede the point. However, the president is quite correct that in the larger political community — I mean, as we got into this issue, and I began looking at all the Democrats that said he should either resign or he had no credibility or they needed to talk to him and they just, you know, they couldn't stand him. I mean, there's a lot of them out there, all on the record. So, in fact, he was not popular with members of Congress on the Democratic side of the aisle. COOPER: Van, last night we saw a pretty measured response from the White House on this special counsel probe. Today, the president tweeting about it calling it a witch hunts. That doesn't — doesn't that actually resonate with his base? I mean the notion that everyone is out to get him? I assume that's why — either he just has no control over himself and he just blurts these things out and he generally believes them. Or, you know, it's — he blurts them out and he believes them and he's trying — he believes it helps stir up the base? VAN JONES, CNN HOST, THE MESSY TRUTH: I think he is correct in that. However, what's interesting is a different Donald Trump. When he ran, he was this tough guy, this guy who's going to get things done, this great negotiator. He was Trumpzilla (ph). He was going to make Washington, you know, bow down. He was going to drain the swamp. Now he's president snowflake, OK? Everything he said, "Oh, they're mean to me and they don't like me and I just don't understand it and it's not fair." So you have a big brand shift going on. Now, it's still works with his base because his base says, "Listen, you know, this is our guy and now our guy's under fire." But for most people he looks increasingly bizarre. People who didn't buy the product at least thought they knew what it was. It turns out you got — you don't have Trumpzilla, you got president snowflake. ### COOPER: I guess I just think — it seems to me that this is an opportunity for him to reset things to put this, as Gloria said, to compartmentalize it and just move forward on the agenda that he has. LORD: Well, I do agree with that. I mean, this takes this off the board for the moment and he should just focus like a laser on his agenda. He's about to go abroad for, what, 11 days, whatever. This is a very, very significant trip. It's very important to him. It's very important to the country. It's very important to the world. He's going to be focused on that. And when we comes back, you know, health care and tax reform just laser on in on it. The one thing I do want to say, Anderson, in terms of that commencement speech, he also said something that I know has inspired people. He talks about this kind of thing all the time about thinking big and never, ever giving up. And that you got to be subjected to the critics and all that sort of thing. That is inspiring. That's inspired a lot of his audiences over time and it was a good thing to be saying to a commencement. COOPER: Jeff — sorry, Van, I mean, the president went back also today to his original — or the original White House version of events surrounding Comey's firing that it was Rod Rosenstein's letter on Comey that played a role in his decision. How do you square that with his comments last week to NBC that it was his decision that he planned to fire Comey even before he got Rosenstein's letter? And why — I mean, why would he be going back now to that today? JONES: Anderson, trying to square comments by Donald Trump is like trying to square a golf ball. There's no square there. It's all circular. So there's no way you can figure this stuff out except that he is impulsive and erratic and possibly dishonest. But what I think that we got to pay attention to now is you got to watch the conservative movement as they try to process all this stuff. You have an Ann Coulter who was his biggest fan stepping away from him now saying she's disappointed. At the same time, you have a Newt Gingrich doubling down and saying it's going to have to be all-out war. And, you know, what we think matters somewhat, but what's going on in the conservative movement right now? Do they have any principles at all just with regard to honesty, forthrightness, you know, well-run organizations and institutions, or are they going to get pulled further and further away from their own principles? And I think you're starting to see some early signs. Ann Coulter was not crucified for criticizing Donald Trump. That was I think a significant development. If others start to move away, then he's got real trouble. Right now they're still holding with them.

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GOP Rep. Kinzinger Supports Special Counsel: If Trump Has Nothing To Hide, This Will Exonerate Him


Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger (IL) said if the president has nothing to hide, the special counsel that will investigate Russian involvement in the 2016 U.S. presidential election "will exonerate him." "The appointment of this does not indicate guilt, it's just saying we have some legitimate questions," the Congressman said in an interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper Thursday night. Transcript, via CNN: ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: Congressman, you're one of few Republican congressmen in the House who's now publicly supporting the appointment of special counsel to investigate Russia. Do you think more Republicans are going to start to follow suit? And if so, is that trouble for President Trump? REP. ADAM KINZINGER (R), ILLINOIS: Well, I think it's the right thing to do. I called for this yesterday morning. I said, look, this has gotten too partisan, and basically any new piece of information, people now put through their partisan stripes instead of, you know, what really happened. So, I think you're going to see more people follow in terms of saying, hey, this is the right thing to do, let's move forward. And I don't know if it's going to be trouble for the president at all. I think we need all the facts out there. Either the facts are going to say when it's all said and done, there was nothing here, or there may be something there and if there is, we deserve to know about it. But my main concern right now, Anderson, is not so much 2018, 2020. It's the institution of government and people have lost so much faith in it that I think for a moment, we have to put aside our partisan politics to do that — to do right. COOPER: It's possible, though, that the special counsel will find that there was nothing illegal that was done but certainly in the minds of some voters, something wrong was done, morally or just inappropriate. But it doesn't cross a legal threshold and it's possible the special counsel would not even make a report in that case, explaining what happened. KINZINGER: Yes, that's possible. If the special counsel comes to that, then it really becomes a political question. If somebody says, yes, but I think he did something morally or whatever, they would put that politics into action. If there's a law issue, obviously, then we get that and we understand where to go forward from there depending on what it is. You know, I don't think — no matter what happens out of this, 100 percent of Americans are not going to be satisfied that all justice was done. But I do think that putting it through an independent counsel like this, you're going to have more Americans that — with whatever the end result is — have more faith in the system than had it gone through Congress. COOPER: When the president said the appointment of a special counsel hurts our country terribly and labels it a witch hunt, is he just wrong? I mean, are those statements appropriate? KINZINGER: I think he is wrong. I don't think it's a witch hunt. Look, if the president thinks there's nothing to hide in this, this will exonerate him. And this will — look, President Reagan had a special counsel appointed on him and he was a very successful president for eight years. The appointment of this does not indicate guilt. It's just, say, we have some legitimate questions. What's great about our democracy, and a lot of the times we get into this kind of trees in the forest and we forget looking at the big forest — what's great about our democracy is we hold our leaders accountable. There are so many countries around the world that they can't do that. Kinzinger also shared similar thoughts with MSNBC's Greta van Susteren:

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Sally Yates: Flynn Was A “National Security Threat”


Fired Assistant U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates is interviewed by Anderson Cooper on Tuesday's broadcast of CNN's Anderson Cooper 360. YATES: Yes, I don't think there was anything at all unclear about the first meeting. Mr. McGahn had some additional issues he wanted to discuss. But there was nothing unclear about the first meeting. COOPER: Can you say what the additional issues were? YATES: Sure. There were three or four different things that he raised. The first issue that he raised was essentially, why does DoJ care if one White House official lies to another White House official? And so we walked him back through the same things that we had discussed the day before, that it was really a whole lot more than just one White House official lying to another. COOPER: This was the vice president of the United States being lied to… YATES: Right. COOPER: … who then went and told the American people. YATES: Exactly. And then that we explained the compromise situation that this created again. So we walked back through all of those things. COOPER: So that's why the Department of Justice was interested, because of the underlying behavior but also the potential for compromise. YATES: Right. And we felt like… COOPER: It was a national security threat. YATES: Absolutely. COOPER: You have no doubt about that? YATES: I don't think anybody in the intel community has a doubt about that.

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Jorge Ramos: “102 Days Of Fear” Under Trump; Americans “Complicit” In Illegal Immigration


Jorge Ramos appeared on Monday's edition of CNN's Anderson Cooper 360 to talk about President Trump's "102 days of fear," the president's proposed border wall, and how Americans are complicit in illegal immigration. Ramos acknowledged the proposed border wall it is a deterrent because it creates fear. However, he said there will always be people willing to cross any barrier to get into the U.S. "I think it's a deterrent, there's no question about it," Ramos said about the wall. "Fear, fear works. But I think when we're talking about undocumented immigrants, we're talking about human beings, and we're talking about people who are here because of us." Ramos also acknowledged that, yes, illegal immigrants broke the law, but said Americans are "complicit" whenever we eat food. "The Trump policy is emphasizing the arrest of people really who have done nothing, absolutely nothing wrong in this country," Ramos said of illegal immigrants. "Yes, they broke the law by coming here illegally but we're all complicit whenever we're eating food, whenever we live in a house or an apartment. It was built by immigrants. We're all complicit. So my concern is what Trump is doing and terrorizing the immigrant community." But Ramos said illegals are human beings, and if Trump has a big heart as he says he has, then he "can do something." Ramos said if the president wants to be like Reagan, then be like Reagan and do something like the 40th president did in 1986, referring to the Immigration Reform and Control Act. "Yes, fear works but I think we're talking about human beings and if Donald Trump has a big heart like he has then I think we can do something. He controls the White House. He controls both chambers of Congress. He can do something. If he wants to be like Reagan, be like Reagan," Ramos told Cooper. ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: Jorge the May Day protest, protesting among other issues the president's immigration policies which are obviously central to the campaign or surprised the president hasn't been able to enact more of his immigration policies, whether it's funding of the wall or the travel ban or defunding sanctuary cities? JORGE RAMOS, ANCHOR, UNIVISION: Well, not really surprised, but really for the Hispanic community and the immigrant community, it's been horrible. It's been very difficult. It's been 102 days of fear. Don't hold your breath on getting a check from Mexico. The check is not in the mail. Mexico won't pay for that. And I'm not surprised that the new budget does not include money for the wall. It's really absurd. As we've discussed in the past, almost 45 percent are low, undocumented immigrants they come by plane or with a visa. And it would be as absurd as if I want to be the fence on my property and then I ask my neighbor to pay for that. So in that sense the wall, I don't think it's going to work. I think a good immigration policy, emphasizing legal immigration now the wall would be good. But on the other hand, fear is still present. COOPER: Just in terms as the wall, the White House is standing by. Sean Spicer, again, just today said the wall is going to get built. Do you believe it will ever get built in a way that President Trump described it? RAMOS: Not the way he described it. And — so look there's a 9,200 border between Mexico and the United States. There are already fences or walls in about 700. So we still have like 1,200-mile wall that President Trump wants to build. I don't know how he's going to do it. The estimates that I've seen suggest that it could cost from $20 billion to $50 billion. I don't think it going to — and it's completely useless. Let me just say, it's completely useless. Again, when almost half of all immigrants come by plane or with a visa, why do you need a wall? And as long as you have about 20 million Americans in this country using drugs and paying for drugs, there's always going to be a drug traffic in Latin America willing to take the risk in crossing that wall. COOPER: For those that who support the president's ideas of stopping undocumented immigrants from coming over, I mean there have been successes that the White House can point to. If you look at the numbers in December of last year, there are more than 43,000 apprehensions by customs and border agents, in March, just over 12,000. So there has been, I mean, there's so much of the 68 percent decline in apprehensions of people crossing over that is something the White House can point to as a success. RAMOS: Yes, but — correction (ph) other numbers, Anderson. For instance, in the first two months of the Trump administration, the number of arrests of undocumented immigrants went from about 16,000 in the Obama years, a year before to about 21,000. And what I'm really concerned is about the number of undocumented immigrants with not criminal record. We're talking about motors and that's — and people who are only here working and no rapist or criminals or members of any gang. So, the concern is that the new policy, the Trump policy is emphasizing the arrest of people really who have done nothing, absolutely nothing wrong in this country. Yes, they broke the law by coming here illegally but we're all complicit whenever we're eating food, whenever we live in a house or an apartment. It was built by immigrants. We're all complicit. So my concern is what Trump is doing and terrorizing the immigrant community. COOPER: So, even — you don't believe that even deporting those who have not committed a crime and whether it's — whether they're actually going out and actively seeking those people, whether those people — RAMOS: Yes. COOPER: — you know, under the Obama administration, many of them would come and check in yearly. It seems like the people are even now checking — have had to check in yearly in safety under the Obama administration, those people now when they check in, in many cases, they are being apprehended and deported out. RAMOS: Exactly. COOPER: It clearly creates fear. I understand that in the community. But do you think it actually does prevent others from coming over? RAMOS: As a deterrent, yes. I think it's a deterrent, there's no question about it. Fear, fear works. But I think when we're talking about undocumented immigrants, we're talking about human beings, and we're talking about people who are here because of us. We have to take responsibility for that. They are here because they are working for us. Millions of Americans, you and me and those who are watching, benefit from that and there are thousands of American companies who are hiring them for a reason. It's simply a matter of is then and economy supply and demand. So, yes, fear works but I think we're talking about human beings and if Donald Trump has a big heart like he has then I think we can do something. He controls the White House. He controls both chambers of Congress. He can do something. If he wants to be like Reagan, be like Reagan. Like, 19 — in 1986, he did something about it. He legalized more that three million. Now if we can legalize 11 million, do you have a big heart Mr. Trump? Show it. He hasn't show it yet.

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Glenn Beck: Trump Looking Like “Another Republican Who Said Stuff, Didn’t Mean It”


CNN: The Blaze founder Glenn Beck tells CNN's Anderson Cooper that President Donald Trump is abandoning his voters after flipping his stance on China, Russia, and other campaign trail promises. Transcript, via CNN: ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: Glenn, I mean, you haven't been — obviously, you're no fan of Bannon. Though, there was this quote from Newt Gingrich in the "Washington Post," and I just want to read it. He said, "Bannon is a brilliant pirate who has had a huge impact, but White House is in the end are like the U.S. Navy Corporate Structures and very hard on pirates." Is he right? I mean, is this just a matter of different styles of there's more going on here? GLENN BECK, FOUNDER, THEBLAZE: No, I don't know. I hate to make this into a reality show especially with reality president. And, you know, who's going to be next to be voted off the island. But, I think that Bannon was instrumental in a few things that didn't go well for the president. And the president likes to win. Also, I mean, I don't know anybody who would bet against the son-in- law winning in the end. COOPER: Yeah. BECK: What was disturbing here is a couple things. When you bring a guy in who was supposedly on the outside and get — gave Breitbart really to the campaign. When he leaves, what does he do on the outside? (CROSSTALK) BECK: Yeah, and a danger in two ways. Is he on the outside but still kind of in, so he's influencing from a distance or is he angry and turns that populist (inaudible) against the president. There's, you know, what he's done just this week with Syria, North Korean, even dropping MOAB today, Russia, the export-import bank, those things were all very big with the far-right in the populist movement that was angry. You don't inflict the wound on them. They're now thinking, who is this guy? Do they feel betrayed? We can worry about that little circle, but really the most disturbing thing that Bannon was a part of was this idea that we're going to put sanctions on the biggest currency manipulator in the history of the world, that's what the president said, China. The reason why he said that and it connected with a lot of people, not me, but a lot of people and it connected because there were people out in the countries that really Donald Trump was their lost hope. I haven't had a raise since 2001. Who is going to understand it? How do they feel today when the president reverses all of this policy and that's where they put their stock that I'm going to get a job — my job is coming back or I'm going to get a better job. He's just abandoned a lot of people. COOPER: Well, I mean, he's abandoned people but also just — things he stood by and said very loudly and very effectively on the campaign trail. The currency manipulator thing is one, obviously, NATO is obsolete, now it's not obsolete, even though nothing really has changed with NATO, it's just the president has changed. But he doesn't even acknowledge that he's changed. I keep thinking about — BECK: Right. COOPER: — the Republican candidates who were against him in the primary who, you know, were kind of — you know, had policy positions and were sort of trying to be presidential and stand by positions and Donald Trump, you know, very effectively, obviously, but was able to basically just kind of take some very extreme positions and kind of make fun of the others, but now has adopted the very positions he ran against and effectively won against. BECK: This is so far — I mean, I can't speak for tomorrow. But today, so far, it's not my worst nightmare. My worst nightmare was that the president would turn to Steve Bannon and he'd go down this populist burn it to the ground ideology. The good news is he's not going that way, but the next question is where is he going? Is he going left? Is he going — he's not going conservative. And, who is he going to have left in the end? Who's going to believe him? This is why I warned my audience and America that he doesn't have a core. He goes for the win. And that can be dangerous if things start to fall apart economically or, you know, in the world. But it — tonight at least, it looks the president is on the verge of beginning to look like another Republican who said stuff, didn't mean it, and turned into Reince Priebus or Paul Ryan and that's not good, but I remembered, Anderson, what Pres. Bush said to me. I was in the Oval Office the day that candidate Obama said that he would just fly over to borders in Pakistan and if he had to he would bomb Pakistan. And I remember at that time Pakistan was very important ally for us and I remember thinking, my gosh, you don't bomb an ally. And, this took on real weight because it was said by the president and he pointed to his desk in the Oval Office and he said don't worry, whoever occupies that seat behind that desk, man or woman, will quickly find out that their hands are tied and they'll end up doing almost exactly as I have done.

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